Consider Native/Adaptive Plants

Santafe.com - August 8, 2011

"Using native/adaptive plants doesn’t mean sacrificing an attractive natural garden"

Consider using New Mexico native/adaptive plants for sustainability. Native/adaptive plants will increase the likelihood of planting success, are low maintenance and require less water. Native/adaptive plants also require very little soil amendments such as fertilizer and very little future fertilization. Native/adaptive plants will adapt well to the strong winds, cold evenings and intense New Mexico heat.

Using native/adaptive plants doesn’t mean sacrificing an attractive natural garden. Native/adaptive plants still provide color, texture or style. You can create native wildflower and drought-resistant grass meadows for all four seasons.

Here are just some of the native/adaptive plants that adapt well in the Santa Fe Area:

Chamisa or Rabbitbrush (Deciduous Shrub 3’ – 4’ tall)

Apache Plume (Evergreen Shrub standing 6’)

Autumn Sage (Shrub 2’ – 3’)

Coneflower (Perennial 3’ – 4’)

Penstemon (24” to 36” X 15”)

Gayfeather (Perennial 1’ to 3’ tall)

Blue Grama (Grass)

Globemallow (Perennial 20” to 40” tall )

Agave

Service Berry (Deciduous Shrub 20’)

Winterfat (Shrub 1’-2’)

Big Sage (Shrub 2’ – 6’)

Silver Sage (Shrub 2’ -3’)

Mountain Mahogany (Shrub 6’ -20’)

Desert Willow (Shrub 10’ – 25’)

New Mexico Privet (Shrub 20’)

Creosotebush (EG Shrub 4’ – 8’)

 Wild Plum (Shrub 10’)

Chokecherry (Shrub/Tree 10’ – 20’)

Mockorange (Shrub 4’ – 6’)

Cinquefoil (Shrub 3’)

Cliffrose (Shrub 3’)

Golden Current (Shrub 4’)

New Mexico Locust (Tree 8’ – 15’)

Narrowleaf Yucca (3’ – 5’)

Blue Grama Grass (8” -12”)

Buffalo Grass (4” – 6”)

* All plants can be seen by using an image search on a search engine website.