New Beginnings, Books and Jobs

Santafe.com - November 7, 2011

"This fall, I have been fortunate to have several amazing things occur"

Winter is almost here.  Time is getting short for those of us that look upon autumn as a time for new beginnings.  For me, and possibly for you, this is an old pattern left over from beginning a new school year after a summer of play. The cooler weather makes our blood run faster. Our inner clock chimes loudly, telling us that it’s time to start new projects, or to complete those already begun. We go to work and are productive.       

Victor Frankel, the renowned German psychiatrist who not only survived Nazi prison camps, but went on to lead a highly active life and to write his famous book.  Man’s Search for Meaning tells us that in order to lead a fulfilled, much more happy life, we must be involved in something that is bigger than ourselves. From my own experience, and from observing others, I know that Frankel’s wisdom makes a huge difference in my life.  Santa Fe has over 300 foundations of all types, so you might want to give your heart and energy to someone who needs help.

This fall, I have been fortunate to have several amazing things occur.  It has been a period of a happy new beginning.  I sent my novel, Blind Exodus, off to a potential publisher yesterday. It is the story of my ancestors’ exodus to Mexico; it began in 1880, when the U.S. Marshals sent Mormon Polygamists to jail. The Mormons were desperate for sanctuary.  They joined the exodus to Mexico.  My grandfather smuggled guns across the U.S./Mexico border for Poncho Villa. The colonists barely escaped murder by the revolutionaries.  Please send me positive thoughts. This amazing history must become available to the public.

Another good thing has happened.  I’ve been asked to join the Smithsonian Library Board, which will take me back to Washington D.C. where I once lived. In addition, friends from 50 years ago have come back into my life. Today, I’m feeling blessed and fulfilled.  
                                                          
Until next time, stay warm,

Charlie