Nambe Falls - SantaFe.com
This fall is nestled into the Nambé Pueblo and offers two options. After paying the $15 entrance fee you will be directed to either the “dry” or “wet” trail, both aptly named. The quarter mile dry trail will take you up a gentle incline to a birds-eye view of the tiered waterfall.
If you’re looking for a more challenging and refreshing hike, brave the quarter mile wet trail, water shoes recommended. Be warned, the water is cold. The trail will take you winding and crossing the river upstream for half of it. The hike is worth the frozen toes. The lowest pool is the perfect place to relax and listen to the falls.

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